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Around Town June 2017


(Back row, l-r): Trent Fulin, Vice President of Operations, Houston Methodist The Woodlands; Mary Beth Oglesby; Dr. Loren Rourke, breast surgical oncologist; Janice Green; Sondra Himmer, Houston Methodist Foundation;  (front row): Kay Hohman; Frances McDougal; Debbie Sukin, CEO, Houston Methodist The Woodlands; Barbara Hilton; Maggie Marmack; and Whitney Arriaga, Houston Methodist Breast Care Center.

(Back row, l-r): Trent Fulin, Vice President of Operations, Houston Methodist The Woodlands; Mary Beth Oglesby; Dr. Loren Rourke, breast surgical oncologist; Janice Green; Sondra Himmer, Houston Methodist Foundation;  (front row): Kay Hohman; Frances McDougal; Debbie Sukin, CEO, Houston Methodist The Woodlands; Barbara Hilton; Maggie Marmack; and Whitney Arriaga, Houston Methodist Breast Care Center.

FAITH “FIGHTING CANCER” DONATES $50,000 TO HOUSTON METHODIST BREAST CARE CENTER AT THE WOODLANDS

FAITH “Fighting Cancer” in Montgomery County presented a check for $50,000 to Houston Methodist Breast Care Center at The Woodlands for the purchase of a SAVI SCOUT radar localization system. An alternative to wire localization, SCOUT is a wire-free, FDA-cleared device used by surgeons and radiologists to precisely locate and direct the removal of a tumor during a lumpectomy or surgical biopsy procedure.

SCOUT uses non-radioactive, micro impulse radar technology to provide real-time surgical guidance during breast surgery. Rather than placing a wire immediately before surgery, a SCOUT reflector is placed in the target tissue up to 30 days prior to surgery. During surgery, the SCOUT hand piece accurately pinpoints the location of the reflector and the tumor.

“A number of our board members and members of their families have gone through what some would describe as a ‘barbaric’ procedure with the insertion of a wire into the breast, prior to a lumpectomy. When we learned that SAVI SCOUT would allow doctors to locate and remove breast cancer without a wire, we wanted to do our part to ensure women in Montgomery County would have access to this advanced treatment,” said Maggie Marmack, FAITH Board member.

FAITH “Fighting Cancer” in Montgomery County formed in 2010 when a group of women wanted to assist the community by providing cancer-related educational services and preventative testing for men, women and children. FAITH is supported by nearly 20 volunteers and has no paid employees; every dime raised goes back into the community. The nonprofit organization has raised more than $500,000 to help area cancer patients and their families.

“We always look for ways to help, and when we learned we could purchase a tangible item that could be used every day to help women in Montgomery County, we knew we wanted to do it,” added Marmack.

Dr. Loren Rourke, breast surgical oncologist and Houston Methodist regional breast program director, quickly confirmed SAVI SCOUT will be used often and provides a far superior experience for breast cancer patients.

“The ability to precisely locate and direct the removal of a tumor during a lumpectomy or surgical biopsy enables surgeons to increase the probability of complete cancer removal and reduces the likelihood of needing follow-up surgeries. In addition, the ability to strategically plan the incision may result in less tissue being removed during surgery, resulting in better cosmetic outcomes,” said Rourke.

Thanks to FAITH “Fighting Cancer” Houston Methodist Breast Care Center at The Woodlands is the first facility in The Woodlands and the northern region to have and utilize SAVI SCOUT.

“I am honored for FAITH to support our breast center and vision of leading medicine with this significant donation, which will change lives,” said Debbie Sukin, chief executive officer, Houston Methodist The Woodlands Hospital and regional senior vice president, Houston Methodist.

Visit houstonmethodist.org/­the­woodlands for more information.

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(L-R): Dana Pritchard, The Woodlands Car Club; Pat Edwards, Assistance League of Montgomery County; Janet Sheahan, Assistance League of Montgomery County; Janita Love, Assistance League of Montgomery County and Noemi Gonzales, Market Street.

(L-R): Dana Pritchard, The Woodlands Car Club; Pat Edwards, Assistance League of Montgomery County; Janet Sheahan, Assistance League of Montgomery County; Janita Love, Assistance League of Montgomery County and Noemi Gonzales, Market Street.

MARKET STREET DONATES MORE THAN $2,300 FOR ASSISTANCE LEAGUE OF MONTGOMERY COUNTY PROGRAMS

As part of its Change for Charity initiative, Market Street recently donated more than $2,300 to the Assistance League of Montgomery County. The funds were raised by Market Street patrons during the first quarter of 2017 and will assist the organization, which provides programs that help strengthen the community. The Montgomery County Chapter spearheads programs that touch every age group, such as poison awareness presentations for Pre-K and kindergarten students, providing fans and blankets for seniors in need, and basic needs for the homeless.

Since the program’s inception, Market Street patrons have raised more than $120,000 for local charities. Four Montgomery County organizations are selected each year to receive a percentage of the funds collected from Market Street’s 68 parking meters during a three-month period.

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Woodforest National Bank CEO Cathy Nash cuts the ribbon to celebrate the opening of the new Woodforest Bank Boat House in Northshore Park surrounded by representatives of Parati Competitive Rowing, The Woodlands Township and the Rowing Club of The Woodlands.

Woodforest National Bank CEO Cathy Nash cuts the ribbon to celebrate the opening of the new Woodforest Bank Boat House in Northshore Park surrounded by representatives of Parati Competitive Rowing, The Woodlands Township and the Rowing Club of The Woodlands.

WOODFOREST BANK BOAT HOUSE OPENING

The Woodforest Bank Boat House has opened in Northshore Park, located at 2505 Lake Woodlands Drive. The brand new 7,000-square-foot boathouse facility on the waterfront of Lake Woodlands provides a home for the Rowing Club of The Woodlands and Parati Competitive Rowing, and includes space open to the public.

Woodforest National Bank, headquartered in The Woodlands, was the main contributor, funding more than 75 percent of the cost to build the facility. This public/private partnership is the first of its kind in The Woodlands, with the Woodlands Township providing the land and the clubs raising money privately to build the boathouse.

“This is an exciting time to be in The Woodlands,” said Cathy Nash, CEO of Woodforest National Bank. “Rowing embodies the values of hard work, discipline and teamwork. By partnering with The Woodlands Township, Woodforest National Bank is honored to ensure this important and growing sport has the opportunity to thrive within our community with this new, permanent facility.”

For more information, call 281-210-3800, or follow group at facebook.com/townshipparksandrec

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(Front row, l-r): Kathryn Jones; Iva Guillam with her service dog, Gus; Renee Kernan, president of The Woodlands Rose chapter OCR; Bob Mennell (Major General Patrick Cleburne’s 7th Texas Infantry Camp, SCV). (back row): Ronee Schneider, Joe Raffels, Roselane Polnick, Charlene Aldridge, Schelle Taylor, Virginia Adickes, Marie Underdown and Pat Spackey.

(Front row, l-r): Kathryn Jones; Iva Guillam with her service dog, Gus; Renee Kernan, president of The Woodlands Rose chapter OCR; Bob Mennell (Major General Patrick Cleburne’s 7th Texas Infantry Camp, SCV). (back row): Ronee Schneider, Joe Raffels, Roselane Polnick, Charlene Aldridge, Schelle Taylor, Virginia Adickes, Marie Underdown and Pat Spackey.

SERVICE DOG ACTS AS MASCOT FOR THE WOODLANDS ROSE CHAPTER, ORDER OF THE CONFEDERATE ROSE

During the recent meeting of The Woodlands Rose Chapter, Texas Society Order of the Confederate Rose (TSOCR), Gus, the service dog of member Iva Gilliam, was elected Official Mascot of the group. Gus was in the Go Texan Parade and attends all meetings and events. Gus is a Bouvier des Flandres breed.

The Woodlands Rose Chapter of the TSOCR supports the Major General Patrick Cleburne’s 7th Texas Infantry Camp, Sons of the Confed­erate Veterans. The group meets the second Tuesday of each month. For more information, contact Renee Kernan at fiddleedee3@yahoo.com.

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A record number of 141 Conroe ISD employee scholarships were awarded by the Conroe ISD Education Foundation for 2017. Those present at the Annual Scholarship Breakfast posed for a photograph.

A record number of 141 Conroe ISD employee scholarships were awarded by the Conroe ISD Education Foundation for 2017. Those present at the Annual Scholarship Breakfast posed for a photograph. PHOTO- Jeremy Hall

CONROE ISD EDUCATION FOUNDATION SHATTERS RECORDS, HOSTS SELL-OUT CROWD AND RAISES $200,000

“The view of this jam-packed room from up here is absolutely amazing!” announced Nelda Luce Blair, President of the Conroe ISD Education Foundation (CEF), as she took the podium stage to welcome the crowd on April 20. Over 600 attendees sold out the Marriott Waterway Hotel & Convention Center venue for the Annual Scholarship Breakfast, most of them attracted by what Blair termed the “feature presentation” by one of the most successful school district superintendents in Texas, Conroe ISD Superintendent Dr. Don Stockton with “The State of Conroe ISD.” The Montgomery County business community mixed with elected officials, representatives from higher education and other school districts, scholarship recipients and families to hear the report and
bolster the CEF’s singular mission: to support Conroe ISD. This year, that support broke all records for attendance, scholarships awarded, and funds raised.

Along with the traditional college scholarships for CISD senior students, the CEF administers the “All Means All” Scholarships founded by CISD educator Sam Cable, awarded as an incentive college fund to select ninth-graders. However, as CISD needs have adapted over time, the CEF has likewise adapted its awards to support CISD personnel in obtaining degrees. First offered strictly to teachers, then expanded to administration, the CEF currently awards scholarships to all Conroe lSD employees who have a college degree, but desire a master’s or doctorate level advanced degree. Most recently, the CEF Board fulfilled another CISD need by creating the “Earl Stockton Memorial Scholarship” for paraprofessional bilingual educators, to enable them to become fully degreed teachers for CISD.

As CEF board members Amanda Trapp and Dr. Ann Snyder began announcing the scholarship winners, records were shattered as 14 CISD senior students from every high school, and 141 CISD employees were awarded scholarships to pursue college degrees. “The Foundation has literally created a buzz of excitement in our school district,” declared Stockton. “We have educators and other employees with master’s and Ph.D. degrees that would never have been achieved without those funds. In addition, the Foundation scholarships provide a significant incentive to draw exceptional people to work at CISD.”

CEF executive director Maris Blair, the main architect of the annual scholarship breakfast, is particularly proud of another shattered record, for donations raised. “Every year, we are overwhelmed by the generosity of people from all over the region and from every sector. This year, we were thrilled to raise a record of over $200,000. Since the Foundation receives no school district monies, no property tax funding, and no government subsidies, it relies solely on donations. Those funds will go a long way toward supporting Conroe ISD by improving the education level of its students and personnel.”

“Our Board of Directors continually looks for new ways to support Conroe ISD, and the more funds we raise, the stronger that support can grow,” Blair explained. “So, the Foundation’s donors are the absolute core of our existence. Of course, our scholarship breakfast is our one major fundraiser each year. However, we do accept all types and amounts of contributions any day of the year.”

For more information, call 281-363-3997 or visit cisdeducationfoundation.org

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(Front row, l-r): Lady Dalton, Carol Hicks, Martha Gandy, Shelly Lane, Barbara Stevens, Erin Rose, Jillian Spackey, Pat Spackey; (second row): Virginia Murray, Carolyn Walker, Betty Dutton, Jaye Hendon, Kathy Williams, Elaine Collings, Mary Jones, Susan Spackey, Julia Spackey, S. Ted Spackey, Jenna Spackey, H. Ted Spackey, Maureen Chegin; (back row): Larry Stevens, Ann Laird, Suzanne Reese, Shannon McDonald, Bob Harper, Wendy Hicks, Jennifer Searle and Kameron Searle.

(Front row, l-r): Lady Dalton, Carol Hicks, Martha Gandy, Shelly Lane, Barbara Stevens, Erin Rose, Jillian Spackey, Pat Spackey; (second row): Virginia Murray, Carolyn Walker, Betty Dutton, Jaye Hendon, Kathy Williams, Elaine Collings, Mary Jones, Susan Spackey, Julia Spackey, S. Ted Spackey, Jenna Spackey, H. Ted Spackey, Maureen Chegin; (back row): Larry Stevens, Ann Laird, Suzanne Reese, Shannon McDonald, Bob Harper, Wendy Hicks, Jennifer Searle and Kameron Searle.

DRT, JUDGE N.H. DAVIS CHAPTER CELEBRATE 50TH ANNIVERSARY

The Daughters of the Republic of Texas (DRT), Judge Nathaniel Hart Davis chapter in Montgomery recently celebrated its 50th anniversary at Living Savior Lutheran Church Fellowship Hall. Shelly Lane, president of the DRT chapter welcomed Barbara Stevens, the DRT president general elect (2017-2019) and the past presidents of the chapter: Martha Gandy, Ann Laird, Suzanne Reese, Virginia Murray, Lady Dalton, Mary Crossley, Pat Spackey and Carol Hicks.

Lane presided as Gandy (president 1970-1971) was honored by the chapter, and as past president Laird told of the Martha and W.H. Gandy family’s history and influence in the Montgomery County area. Martha Gandy is a descendant of Judge Nathaniel Hart Davis, the chapter’s namesake.

The chapter announced its DRT 4th Grade Essay winner and Outstanding Texas History Teacher from the chapter. Lane presented Jillian Spackey, fourth-grade student at Galatas Elementary in The Woodlands, with a certificate and pin for her award-winning essay on Sam Houston – A Texas Hero. Jillian is the daughter of Susan and S. Ted Spackey and the granddaughter of Pat and Ted Spackey. She is a member of the Charles B. Stewart Chapter, Children of the Republic of Texas. Pat Spackey and her son S. Ted, and Jenna, Julia, and Jillian are descendants of Texas Patriot Charles B. Stewart.

Erin Rose was selected as the chapter’s Outstanding Texas History Teacher of the Year. She teaches Texas history at Booker T. Washington Junior High School in Conroe. Erin comes from a family of educators, all of whom were history teachers. She has taught at Booker T. Washington for 13 years. Erin taught eighth-grade United States history for six years and seventh-grade Texas history for the past seven years. She is the National Junior Honor Society Sponsor and a SHSU Mentor for student teachers. Erin is the daughter of Judge N.H. Davis DRT chapter member Cheryl Bolt, and her father is Bob Harper, who attended the celebration, along with Erin’s friends, Shannon McDonald and Mary Jones.

President general Barbara Stevens (2017-2019) succeeds the outgoing president general Betty Edward (2015-2017). Stevens has been a DRT member for 28 years and has served as registrar general and CRT registrar general, president general elect, and has held many DRT state offices and served on many committees. She is in numerous lineal organizations, including DAR and U.S. Daughters of 1812 and is a history re-enactor who designs and shares the history of period attire. Stevens installed the new chapter officers for the 2017-2019 term: Shelly Lane (president); Pat Spackey (vice-president); Cheryl Bolt (secretary); Carol Hicks (treasurer); Ann Laird (chaplain); Suzanne Reese (registrar);
Wendy Hicks (historian); Lady Dalton (parliamentarian); and Paula Dossett and Deanna Mathieson (CRT co-sponsors).

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New Danville Wranglers, who are the residents and participants of the New Danville community, cheer on Oscar-award winning actress, Mira Sorvino, as she arrives at the 9th annual Tea on the Lawn benefit.

New Danville Wranglers, who are the residents and participants of the New Danville community, cheer on Oscar-award winning actress, Mira Sorvino, as she arrives at the 9th annual Tea on the Lawn benefit. PHOTO – DWC Photography (Dave Clements)

MIRA SORVINO SHINES AT 9TH ANNUAL TEA ON THE LAWN

If it had been a movie, Hollywood-star Mira Sorvino gave a performance worthy of an Oscar during Friday’s 9th annual Tea on the Lawn. Yet, it wasn’t a movie, nor a performance. It was a stirring, personal account from a committed human rights advocate.

Sorvino, an Oscar-winning actress, served as the guest speaker for this year’s Tea on the Lawn benefit which was held at the Lone Star Convention Center. The event is designed to raise money and awareness on behalf of New Danville, a community in Willis which provides individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities various opportunities to live enriched and purposeful lives.

The hundreds of attendees fixated their attention as Sorvino shared her experiences as a U.N. Goodwill Ambassador to Combat Human Trafficking. In that role, she said her travels revealed there are rampant human trafficking atrocities taking place throughout the world. Still, Sorvino pushed a message of hope. By acknowledging that modern-day slavery exists, collectively, and through ongoing public awareness efforts, it can be beaten, she said.

Kathy Sanders, New Danville’s President, said, “It’s a tough subject, but a very important one,” Sanders said. “It can be one of those out-of-sight-out-of-mind crimes, something which is doubly challenging to combat without an engaged public.”

Sanders added that she has personally witnessed the positive powers a community can exact through collaborative efforts.


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