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Around Town Jul 2015


Dozens of volunteers came out to support the Spring Healthy Kids Festival hosted by the Interfaith Community Clinic on May 9.

Dozens of volunteers came out to support the Spring Healthy Kids Festival hosted by the Interfaith Community Clinic on May 9.

INTERFAITH COMMUNITY CLINIC HEALTHY KIDS FESTIVAL HELD AT FORD ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

More than 50 children participated in the 2015 Healthy Kids Festival hosted by The Interfaith Community Clinic (ICC) on Saturday, May 9, at Ford Elementary School. Volunteer dentists, physicians, nurses, and dental assistants provided free dental, medical and vision screenings for children.

“This event is a great opportunity for families with children who do not have health insurance, and who otherwise may not see a doctor or dentist unless they were sick or in pain.” said Dr. Ann Snyder, president & CEO of Interfaith Community Clinic. “But more important, if the volunteer dentists or doctors discover a health issue that needs attention, further care is provided free of charge at The Interfaith Community Clinic,” Dr. Snyder continued.

In addition to the check-ups, children enjoyed visits to educational booths, received dental hygiene supplies and were fitted for a new bicycle helmet. Participants also received information about other community resources, home safety and healthy nutrition.

The ICC opened its doors in 1996 to meet the medical needs of the uninsured population. As the needs of the community have grown, so have the services offered at the clinic. Today, the clinic continues to provide quality basic medical and dental care, counseling and patient services to individuals in need.

A volunteer staff of licensed physicians, nurses, medical providers, dentists, dental assistants, dental hygienists, as well as translators and support personnel work together to provide patient care. Programs are provided free of charge and are funded by the generous financial support of grants, faith based organizations, businesses, civic groups, and individuals.For more information, visit interfaithcommunityclinic.org.

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Fictional 9/11 story follows son of terrorists in America.Fictional 9/11 story follows son of terrorists in America.

Fictional 9/11 story follows son of terrorists in America.Fictional 9/11 story follows son of terrorists in America.

WOODLANDS RESIDENT PUBLISHES 9/11 THRILLER

Sharing BBQ for lunch, Ron Mullins and Chris Jones were discussing events of the day – terrorism in America – when the topic turned to “what ifs.” As the conversation wound down, one of them said, “Someone should write a book about that.” Three years later Ron published “Following My Father’s Path” as an ebook for distribution at Smashwords.com and Amazon.com.

The story begins with the birth of Mustaeen Fahkri at 9 a.m. EST on Sept. 11, 2001 as fear and chaos spread throughout the land. Born to the parents of terrorists in America as part of the team that was to attack the White House, Mustaeen grows up struggling to live in two cultures; as a shadow group, Sabil Saif plan for the twentieth anniversary of the attack on the World Trade Center.

Ron Mullins lives in The Woodlands. His day job is as an investment management consultant with an international financial services company. Ron’s background includes experience as a professional pilot and accountant. He retired from the Naval Reserve as a Lieutenant Commander where he flew helicopters.

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Pinwheels represent children’s lives impacted by Children’s Safe Harbor.

Pinwheels represent children’s lives impacted by Children’s Safe Harbor.

CHILDREN’S SAFE HARBOR SHARES TIPS FOR RECOGNIZING ABUSE.

In recognition of the number of children treated last year for sexual abuse, Children’s Safe Harbor recently placed 1,053 pinwheels among the grounds of the Alan B. Sadler Administrative Building in downtown Conroe. In its 16 years, the nationally accredited children’s advocacy center has never seen this many new cases in a single year, which is mostly attributed to Montgomery County’s population growth. The pinwheels represent the lives impacted by Children’s Safe Harbor and the movement forward toward justice and healing.

Some signs that a child is experiencing violence or abuse are more obvious than others. Victoria J. Constance, MSPH, PhD, executive director of Children’s Safe Harbor, encourages people to trust their instincts. If they suspect abuse, it is enough of a reason to contact the authorities; they do not need proof.

In conjunction with Children’s Advocacy Centers of Texas, Dr. Constance shares these essential primary indicators for recognizing warning signs of possible child abuse:

Unexplained injuries, changes in behavior, returning to earlier behaviors, fear of going home, changes in eating, changes in sleeping, changes in school performance and attendance, lack of personal care or hygiene, risk-taking behaviors or inappropriate sexual behaviors.

If a child outcries, follow these guidelines:

DO: remain calm, believe the child, allow the child to talk, show interest and concern, reassure and support the child’s feelings and take action. It could save a child’s life.

DON’T: panic or overreact, press the child to talk, promise anything you can’t control, confront the offender, blame or minimize the child’s feelings or overwhelm the child with questions.

Children’s Safe Harbor’s mission is to protect and enhance the life of every child who has the courage to battle sexual or severe physical abuse. For more information, visit ChildrensSafeHarbor.org.

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Jacquelyn and Jillian Johnson were selected by JDRF to urge members of Congress to continue research for Juvenile Diabetes.

Jacquelyn and Jillian Johnson were selected by JDRF to urge members of Congress to continue research for Juvenile Diabetes.

JAC & JILL GO UP THE HILL FOR JDRF 2015 CHILDREN’S CONGRESS

The Woodlands will be sending a unique delegation to Washington, D.C. this summer. Jacquelyn and Jillian Johnson have been selected by JDRF to join nearly 160 other children from around the country to remind their Members of Congress of the vital need to continue supporting research that aims to reduce the burden they all share of living with type 1 diabetes (T1D), until a cure becomes available.

These children — ages 4 to 17, and representing all 50 states and the District of Columbia — will visit the nation’s capital as delegates to JDRF 2015 Children’s Congress, to be held July 13-15. Joining them will be six international delegates traveling from Australia, Canada, Denmark, Israel, the Netherlands, and the United Kingdom. These international delegates will partner with U.S. delegates to convey a clear message to the federal government that T1D is a global problem that requires a global effort.

The event, which is held every other summer, will include congressional visits by the delegates and a congressional committee hearing, during which selected delegates and T1D celebrity advocates will testify on the need for continued funding for T1D research. These visits serve as a powerful call to our elected lawmakers to remember the struggle of all those living with the disease, and the importance of supporting and funding T1D research.

“These outstanding children and their families all understand, as I do as a father of a loved one with type 1 diabetes, that T1D tests us every day,” says Derek Rapp, JDRF President and CEO. “Children’s Congress gives all of us one voice to urge Congress to maintain its commitment to supporting research, which is essential to reducing the burden of this disease on us and on our country.”

Everyone knows that living with type 1 diabetes isn’t easy, but for the Johnson sisters, they believe their future lies in the hands of continued research and advances in treatments. “Living with Type 1 Diabetes has been hard” said Jillian, “but technology has improved our lives and that is why we need to continue the research to help us.”

To learn more about JDRF Children’s Congress, visit cc.jdrf.org.

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RED CROSS RECEIVES 50K DONATION FROM GULF STATES TOYOTA AND THE FRIEDKIN GROUP

Texas residents saw more than 35 trillion gallons of water fall across the state in May, according to National Weather Service. Many rivers, lakes and streams were not able to contain the water causing devastating flooding for many residents throughout Texas.

To help with the relief efforts in the most devastated areas, Dan Friedkin, Chairman of Gulf States Toyota and The Friedkin Group, has announced a donation of $50,000, to the American Red Cross.

“The deadly floods and consecutive weeks of severe weather in Texas have caused hardships for many families across the region,” said Friedkin. “The Friedkin Group and Gulf States Toyota want to make sure these families and individuals receive the assistance they need to recover from the devastation. We selected the American Red Cross because their teams are on the ground when disaster strikes and are able to quickly help those most in need. We are glad to provide this donation towards their efforts in the hardest hit areas across Texas.”

The Friedkin Group and Gulf States Toyota have a long history of donating to support those affected by disasters. In 2005, the Friedkin Disaster Relief Fund was established with a $2 million contribution to help provide relief to Hurricane Katrina victims who worked for Toyota and other dealerships. The legacy of support for families is a guiding principle of the company and its affiliates.

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Dr. Ann Snyder, (center), with Ironman athlete ambassadors who selected the Veggie Village Community Donation Garden as their service project ahead of the 2015 Memorial Hermann Ironman Texas.

Dr. Ann Snyder, (center), with Ironman athlete ambassadors who selected the Veggie Village Community Donation Garden as their service project ahead of the 2015 Memorial Hermann Ironman Texas.

IRONMAN FOUNDATION ATHLETE AMBASSADORS VOLUNTEER AT VEGGIE VILLAGE COMMUNITY GARDEN

Fifty Ironman athlete ambassadors from all over North America spent four hours volunteering at Interfaith of The Woodlands Veggie Village Community Donation Garden on May 13. Ironman ambassadors conduct various service projects in Ironman communities with the goal of leaving a positive and lasting impact after the race is over. “We know Ironman events take over the entire community that is hosting the race. This is our way letting residents know Ironman cares and wants to make a difference locally,” said David Deschenes, executive director of The Ironman Foundation. In addition to the volunteer component, each ambassador raises a minimum of $1,000 which is also donated back to the race communities.

Ironman ambassadors harvested and collected fruits and vegetables which will be distributed to Interfaith clients through the Interfaith Food Pantry. In addition to the volunteer hours, The Ironman Foundation presented a $22,000 check to Interfaith and Newton Running donated 36 pairs of running shoes. “We are thrilled that Veggie Village was selected by the athletes as their community service project. We are thankful for their commitment towards making a difference in our community, and for this most generous donation,” said Dr. Ann Snyder, president & CEO of Interfaith of The Woodlands.

Interfaith of The Woodlands is a nonprofit social service agency providing numerous programs and services to meet the needs of The Woodlands and the surrounding area. For more information, visit woodlandsinterfaith .org or call 281-367-1230.

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(L-R): Mary Hazlett of Lone Star College, Mary-Lou Fitch and Patti Rivela of Rivela Plastic Surgery.

(L-R): Mary Hazlett of Lone Star College, Mary-Lou Fitch and Patti Rivela of Rivela Plastic Surgery.

MCYS SELECTS MARY-LOU FITCH AS WOMAN OF DISTINCTION

Montgomery County Youth Services (MCYS) chose Mary-Lou Fitch as its “Woman of Distinction” to be represented at the Montgomery County Women’s Council of Organizations annual luncheon, which was held in May.

Each year, the Montgomery County Women’s Council of Organizations (MCWCO) comes together for the Women of Distinction Luncheon to celebrate all the many accomplishments provided by volunteers to local charitable organizations performed during the year.

“Mary-Lou Fitch has proven herself time and again to have the biggest heart for our area youth,” said John Bracken, executive director for MCYS. “She has served as a former board member, supports our Holiday Project at Christmas, is a member of our Advancement Committee, Ladies Night Out and The Woodlands Golf Classic and Gala committees. She fixes dinner for our Bridgeway Shelter kids while attending Panther Creek Inspiration Ranch on Wednesday evenings and hosts multiple events at her home throughout the year for various MCYS functions.”

Mary-Lou Fitch is a sustainer for National Charity League, The Woodlands Chapter and Cypress Woodlands Junior Forum. She is the past president for Grogans Point Residents Association and continues to serve on many committees and chaired the association’s Woodlands Holiday Home tour.


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